Saturday, September 16, 2017

Event Report & Videos: Don Tate Launches Strong as Sandow: How Eugene Sandow Became The Strongest Man on Earth

By Cynthia Leitich Smith
for Cynsations

Author-illustrator Don Tate hosted a tremendous, successful book launch for Strong as Sandow: How Eugene Sandow Became The Strongest Man on Earth (Charlesbridge, 2017) Sept. 9 at BookPeople in Austin. From the promotional copy:

Friedrich Müller was born sickly and weak, yet he longed to be athletic and strong, like ancient Greek and Roman gladiators. Little Friedrich Müller exercised and exercised but to no avail.

As a young man, Müller found himself under the tutelage of a professional body builder. He learned to work out harder. He lifted heavier weights. Over time, he got bigger and stronger. Then he changed his name to Eugen Sandow.

After defeating the strongest of all strongmen in Europe, Eugen Sandow became a super star. Eventually, he become known as “The Strongest Man on Earth.” Everyone wanted to become “as strong as Sandow.”

Inspired by his own experiences in the sport of body-building, Don Tate tells the story of how Eugen Sandow changed the way people think about exercise and physical fitness.

Backmatter includes more information about Sandow, with suggestions for exercise. An author’s note and extensive bibliography are included.
Fans wore fake mustaches in honor of Sandow's.
 About the Event

Don's wife, Tamera Diggs-Tate, welcomed the crowd, introduced him and explained his personal connection to the book's subject matter--a history of competitive body building. Then Don took the podium, offering the stories behind the stories. From there, the event featured strong-man lifts, a push-ups and popcorn eating competition for kids and a jaw-dropping tie-in cake by Akiko White.

A celebration of conditioning, strength, and grace. 

Book & Cake Videos



Friday, September 15, 2017

Cynsational News

Chandler & Christina launch This Is Not the End (Hyperion) at BookPeople.
By Cynthia Leitich Smith & Gayleen Rabakukk
for Cynsations

Congratulations to fellow Austin author Chandler Baker on the release of This Is Not The End (Hyperion, 2017) in August at BookPeople in Austin! Note: Chandler is shown in conversation with author Christina Soontornvat. See also a video interview with Chandler about the book from Mr.Media.com.

OurStory App from We Need Diverse Books. Peek: "OurStory is a tool for kids, parents, educators, and librarians to discover diverse books. An interactive quiz helps you find the perfect book, and membership levels include access to exclusive content from authors and illustrators and materials that educators and librarians can incorporate into their curriculum and programming."

Struggling With & Regaining Your Confidence in Writing by Sara Letourneau from Writers Helping Writers. Peek: "I don’t want you to give up, and I’m sure you don’t want to, either. So, together, let’s pick ourselves up, dust each other off, and lean on one another as we find our way back to believing in ourselves." See also Creation and Doubt are Conjoined Twins from Jane Friedman.

What to Do When You Realize Classic Books from Your Childhood are Racist by Grace Lin from PBS News Hour. Peek: "She offers her humble opinion on how you can keep loving your favorite classics while acknowledging the out-of-date or harmful parts." See also There Is No Apolitical Classroom: Resources for Teaching in These Times by NCTE's Standing Committee Against Racism and Bias in the Teaching of English.

Clete Barrett Smith on Writing Something Messy and Raw by Jocelyn Rish from Adventures in YA Publishing. Peek: "My agent advised that we not follow up a humorous sci-fi adventure for young readers with such a raw, emotional, perhaps edgy book for teens like Mr. 60%. So I wrote four middle grade books...."

Your Book, The Movie: Interview with a Hollywood Producer by Sharon Bially from Writer Unboxed. Peek: "My studio receives about 25 books per month. To put that in perspective, we also get about 90 to 100 scripts a month, and produce about one movie, one documentary, and one TV series each year."

Ten Tips for Writing Realistic Dialogue by Pamela M. Tuck and Glenda Armand from Lee & Low. Peek: "In trying not to overuse 'said' we sometimes get carried away. One cannot smile or frown words. A way to get around that inconvenient truth is to make a statement about the character just before the line of dialogue...." See also Five Common Mistakes with Dialogue from September C. Fawkes.

Troubleshooting for Writers: 7 Questions to Ask When You Lose Desire to Finish Your Book by Denise Jaden from Jane Friedman. Peek: "Perfectionism equals high standards misdirected. It’s great to try to make your shoes match your purse when you’re going out or to take an extra thirty seconds to buff the hood of your car on a sunny day, but when making art, especially a first draft of art, you don’t want to lose the creative energy that births new ideas."

The Trouble with Action by Vaughn Roycroft from Writer Unboxed. Peek: "...even an Indiana Jones-like tunnel-to-cliff-to-river-rapids 'who’s-got-the-stolen-sacred-relic?' type scene can tempt me to start skimming. And the older I get, the more I skim ‘em."

What Does A Book Editor Do? Macmillan's Rhoda Belleza Has Some Insight On The Covetable Job by Kerri Jarema from Bustle. Peek: "'...I’d say everything I do falls into three major categories,' Belleza says. 'Editing the book and supporting the author; advocating for the book and author; and networking and finding new content.'" See also Interview with Candlewick Press Assistant editor Melanie Cordova by Isabella Corletto from CBC Diversity.

Telling Tales: Strengthen Your Novel Using Oral Storytelling by Christina Soontornvat from Middle Grade Minded. Peek: "I can’t write a book until I tell it out loud to someone else first."

Getting a Reversal of Rights from Elizabeth S. Craig. Peek: "If the contract doesn’t grant you termination rights, and publisher isn’t in breach, your options may well boil down to persuading the publisher to agree to termination—or waiting until the contract allows you to terminate without the publisher’s consent."

How to Keep a Short Story Short by April Bradley from Writers Helping Writers. Peek: "...the contemporary short story has a word count up to 10,000 words, although I’ve seen mention of much higher, and I’ve read ones with greater heft and complex effect."

All Your Questions about Gender-Neutral Pronouns Answered by Desmond Meagley and Youth Radio from Teen Vogue. Peek: "From grammar to what to do if you mess it up."

Which Childhood Experiences Are Appropriate and Says Who? by Christina Berchini from NCTE. Peek: "For my colleague, teaching a text that is far below grade level by nearly every measure was more appropriate than teaching a book that, while containing troubling content, was more intellectually challenging."

50 Years of Young Adult Literature by Edith Campbell from CrazyQuiltsEdi. Peek: "... these here, these outstanding writers? To paraphrase Javaka Steptoe, they are gold."

Author Interview: Cynthia and Sandy Levinson from The World of Peachtree Publishers. Peek: "Young people feel fervently about unfairness. They want to live in—and take action to create—a society that is just and equitable. Some aspects of our Constitution promote those qualities; other, fundamental ones undermine them."

Navajo Author Daniel Vandever Increasing Native Representation in Children's Books by Alysa Landry from Indian Country Today. Peek: "Holden, who is constantly reminded to 'fall in line,' can’t stop his imagination from transforming his bleak environment into one filled with wonder. As he progresses through the school day, Holden’s carefree spirit begins to influence the other students."

Top Six Things Not to Pack for a Writers' Conference by Vicky L. Lorencen. Peek: "I still cringe when I think about some of my behavior at my very first conference. I was so intent on fitting in and making sure people knew that I knew what they knew, that I know I must have been a pain in the bookend."

What's More Important: Author Websites or Social Media? from Jane Friedman. Peek: "What would happen if you not only built a site that strongly associated your author name with your category, genre, or work’s themes, but you also posted content on those themes?"

Rainbow Weekend Writing Intensive (for those identifying as LGBTQIAP+) from March 22 to March 25 at the Writing Barn in Austin. Peek: "Join popular YA authors and Rainbow Box Creators Amy Rose Capetta and Cori McCarthy and Dystel, Goderich & Bourret Vice President and agent Jim MCarthy for the first ever weekend intensive designed and created for LGBTQIAP+ writers of young adult and middle grade, for a weekend of lectures, connection and workshop."

Revising and Re-Imagining Your Novel or Chapter Book: an online class from Harold Underdown and Eileen Robinson at Kid's Book Revisions in October-December 2017. Peek: "...beginning Oct. 3. Intended for anyone revising a novel or chapter book, or planning to get started on revising one soon, the class presents a variety of techniques to help writers both find problems and create new material. The class sessions are slide presentations with a video of the presenter, and students can discuss and ask questions via a chat room. We record all sessions and students can watch or rewatch them as needed. In addition to the class sessions, each student has a 'personal teacher,' who will answer questions, give feedback on 'homework' (trying out the techniques), and provide a manuscript consultation."

Congratulations to National Book Award finalists in the Young People's Literature category! Note, all releases 2017: What Girls Are Made Of by Elana K. Arnold (Carolrhoda Lab), Far From The Tree by Robin Benway (HarperTeen), All the Wind in the World by Samantha Mabry (Algonquin Young Readers), You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins (Farrar Straus & Giroux), Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds (Atheneum), I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez (Knopf Books for Young Readers), Orphan Island by Laurel Snyder (Walden Pond Press), The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (Balzer + Bray), Clayton Bird Goes Underground by Rita Williams-Garcia (Amistad) and American Street by Ibi Zoboi (Balzer + Bray).


This Week at Cynsations

More Personally -- Cynthia

Kudos to Cory Putnam Oakes on Witchtown (HMH Teen, 2017)
The big news is: My Candlewick editor approved my revision, and the novel is off to copyedits! It's Native YA realistic fiction.

The new title is Hearts Unbroken, and we're tentatively looking at a Jan. 2019 publication date on the fall-winter 2018 list.

ARCs should be available in time for the Texas Library Association conference in April in Dallas, and I'll be there!

What else? It's been a week of grading and speechwriting here. I've connected with an anthologist on a poem and another to write a middle-grade short story--more on those projects to come!

Want to work with me? Consider applying for a fall-winter internship!

Congratulations to Mindy McGinnis and the other winners and honorees of the 2017 Katherine Paterson Prize for Young Adult & Children’s Writing from Hunger Mountain: A VCFA Journal of the Arts. The competition was stiff, and it was an honor to judge the competition.

Please consider supporting the VCFA Young Writers Network and hurricane-impacted SCBWI Houston members.

Reminder: Unfortunately, I have time to read very few books for blurbs. That said, any requests should come through editors or agents, not authors or illustrators.

Cynsational Events

Join Cynthia Leitich Smith and the YA Book Club to discuss Tantalize: Kieren's Story, edited by Ming Doyle (Candlewick) at 11 a.m. Sept. 30 at Cedar Park (TX) Public Library.

Register now for The Joke’s On You: The Scoop on Humor, Middle Grade Through Young Adult with faculty Uma Krishnaswami and Cynthia Leitich Smith and special guests: author-comedian Sean Petrie and literary agents Elizabeth Harding and Ginger Knowlton of Curtis Brown Ltd. from Oct. 12 to Oct. 15 at the Highlights Foundation in Milanville, Pennsylvania. See also Cynthia Leitich Smith and Uma Krishnaswami: A Conversation about Humor from The Highlights Foundation.


Personal Links
AICL Recommended

More Personally -- Gayleen
Chris Barton launches Dazzle Ships.

There's nothing like competition to get people involved! I suspect Chris Barton has perfected his audience-engagement skills through many school visits.

A trivia game at his recent BookPeople release party got us all thinking about history and paint patterns from Dazzle Ships: WWI and the Art of Confusion, illustrated by Victo Ngai (Millbrook Press, 2017).

Personal Links

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Guest Post: Tara Dairman on Making Connections in a New State

By Tara Dairman
for Cynthia Leitich Smith's Cynsations

Moving 1,000 miles was not the way I anticipated kicking off 2017, but hey, not much about the last year has been predictable. So when my husband received a new job offer in January, we found ourselves relocating from Colorado to Austin, Texas, in a few short weeks.

Austin has a well-established kidlit community, and I was lucky to have a few friends here already. But still, it was hard for me to leave Colorado, where I had strong bonds with local authors, indie bookstores, and librarians.

Now—and with a brand new middle-grade novel on the way—I needed to start all over again??

Yep. But a few steps I took made the landing much softer than it could have been.

Here’s how I linked up with the writing, bookselling, and library communities in my new hometown—tips that I think would also apply to debut authors looking to get more connected wherever they live.

An Erin Murphy Agency gathering in Austin with authors Dan Richards and Lindsey Lane, along with Tara's husband and daughter, standing: agent Tricia Lawrence, authors Sean Petrie, Liz Garton Scanlon and Tara.

1. Seek out other local authors.
Kidlit authors are among the friendliest and most supportive colleagues a person could wish for. But how do you find them?

If you’re agented, ask your agent if she has other clients in your area. (I didn’t know a soul when I first moved to Colorado, but quickly made some of my best writer friends through agency connections!)

Take advantage of social media. Someone in your network probably knows someone they can connect you with.

Attend events at your local bookstore. Kidlit authors tend to turn out en masse for each others’ launch parties and panels, making the bookstore a great place to meet folks in person.

Austin authors Samantha Clark, Donna Janell Bowman, Tara & her family
at a BookPeople book launch. (photo by Dave Wilson)

2. Connect with local booksellers. Speaking of bookstores, one of the first things I did upon moving to Austin was reach out to the children’s bookseller at local indie BookPeople.

Along with another author who was also new to town, I set up a coffee meeting at the store--which I’d recommend if you and the bookseller have time, since it’s always nice to get to know each other in person!

In this case, I wanted to make sure that the bookseller knew about both my already-published titles and my upcoming one, and that meeting even led to my partnering with the store for this preorder campaign for The Great Hibernation (Wendy Lamb Books/Random House, Sept. 12, 2017).

Sometimes you can even set up a system for signing book orders on demand throughout the year, which is what I did with my local indie where I used to live in Colorado.

But also, remember that it may take some time for a bookstore to warm up to you if you’re new in town or a debut author, and try not to be offended if they’re not suddenly stocking your entire back catalogue the day after you first introduce yourself.

It may not be until after you’ve held a launch event there and brought in a nice crowd that a store will be willing to stock your titles regularly or recommend them.

3. Attend a conference (even if it’s on your own dime). One of the biggest perks of moving to Texas is its statewide network of librarians, who come together each year at the massive Texas Library Association conference.

I sent myself this year so that I could participate in a kidlit “speed-dating” event, where I got to meet lots of librarians—and thanks to that, I’m now on the radar of the organizer for the “What’s New With Texas Authors?” panel, which I hope to participate in at next year’s conference.

And it’s always smart to ask your publisher if they’ll send you; even if they won’t spring for all your travel expenses, they’ll usually at least set you up with a badge so you can attend sessions and wander the exhibit hall for free.

Another conference I made sure to attend soon after moving to Texas was our Austin SCBWI conference. Even though I wasn’t presenting, it was a great way to meet local authors, get my books out in front of members at the bookstore and silent auction, and—most importantly—get inspired by all the amazing craft talks.

If the stress of moving and/or debuting has put you into a writing rut, then attending a local creative conference can be a great way to jumpstart a new project.

Cynsations Notes

School Library Journal said The Great Hibernation "explores some rather important political ideas about individuality and the need for a balance of powers in governance. A strong selection for most middle grade shelves."

Tara Dairman is the author of the All Four Stars middle-grade foodie series (Penguin Random House)—the first of which was an Amazon Best Book of the Month and SCBWI Crystal Kite Award winner.

She has a B.A. in Creative Writing from Dartmouth College and—thanks to an epic round-the-world honeymoon—has visited more than 90 countries.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Guest Interview: Emma Walton Hamilton on Picture Book Summit

By Cate Berry
for Cynthia Leitich Smith's Cynsations

The third annual Picture Book Summit online writing conference will be Oct. 7.

To find out more about this opportunity, which not only allows, but encourages attendance in pajamas, I interviewed one of the founders, Emma Walton Hamilton.

What prompted you to start the Picture Book Summit?

Jon and Laura Backes Bard, Katie Davis, Julie Hedlund and I are longtime friends and colleagues in the children’s lit community. We all regularly contribute to each other’s various programs and endeavors. 

One day we were chatting about the challenges of attending all the conferences we love – the travel, the accommodations, the cost factor, etc. – and it occurred to us that together we could create an online conference specific to picture books that would give people all the value of attending a conference - keynotes, workshops, submission opportunities and so forth - but they could attend from home in their PJs at a fraction of the cost. Thus, Picture Book Summit was born!

The Picture Book Summit seems like such great idea. A whole conference without ever leaving your couch...heaven! Besides the convenience of the online format, what are some specific features that attract a picture book writer?

Tomie dePaola
Picture Book Summit is a world-class conference, jam-packed with value throughout the entire day. There are keynotes from three different Superstar Speakers - this year it’s Tomie dePaola, Carole Boston Weatherford and Adam Rex - who each deliver their own complete session, discussing their craft, giving actionable advice and answering questions.

There are also four separate workshops focusing on a range of craft issues, like nonfiction, writing without preaching, the multiple layers in picture books and pitching and submitting manuscripts to agents.

There are interviews with agents and editors, addressing questions that attendees have asked and submission opportunities to them. 

There are also tons of extra bonuses, like a PJ party the weekend before, handouts and access to recordings after the Summit, networking opportunities via group chats and a Facebook group, free Facebook Live events during the year, and more.

It’s incredible value for the price!

Who is the ideal candidate for your conference?

The Summit is open to anyone who writes, illustrates, or dreams of writing or illustrating picture books. Beginners get a ton of information that helps bring them up to speed quickly, and experienced authors and illustrators get re-energized and inspired.

Is there anyone who is not qualified to attend?

No. There is no question too basic, and no publishing experience or knowledge is required to attend.

If you were attending for the first time, what is a goal you would advise a writer to shoot for during the conference?

It’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the work of our speakers and presenters beforehand, and to have some questions ready to ask.

Beyond that, just watch, listen and learn! It will be a lot of information, but we provide handouts, slide decks and recordings of all the presentations after the fact… so you can pace yourself and just enjoy the day.

Is there anything I haven't addressed about the Picture Book Summit that you'd like our readers to be aware of?

Picture Book Summit is an all-day live broadcast in webinar format. You log in, sit back and enjoy each session one after the other. But even if you can’t attend on the day, or have to miss part of a presentation, the entire event is recorded and available for playback within a few days. All registrants have access to the recordings.

Also, every year Picture Book Summit donates a generous portion of our proceeds to a different charity. To date, we have donated over $10,000. Charities we’ve partnered with so far include Reading Partners and We Need Diverse Books.

This year, Picture Book Summit is giving to students “coast to coast.” Proceeds from Picture Book Summit 2017 will be donated to two Title 1 schools - Harrison Elementary in Cottage Grove, OR, and Lincoln Elementary, in New Britain, CT. A portion of each Summiteer’s ticket will go directly to each school’s library.

Cynsations Notes
Emma Walton Hamilton is a best-selling children’s book author, editor and writing coach.

With her mother, actress/author Julie Andrews, Emma has co-authored over thirty children’s books, eight of which have been on the New York Times Bestseller list, including The Very Fairy Princess series, illustrated by Christine Davenier (Little Brown, 2010).

She is director of the Children’s Lit Fellows program at Stony Brook University.

Cate Berry is a recent graduate of Vermont College of Fine Arts, Writing for Children and Young Adult MFA program (July/2017) receiving her Picture Book Intensive Certificate in the process.

Cate is an active member of SCBWI and the Austin children's literature community. She teaches numerous picture book classes at the Writing Barn in Austin, where she lives with her husband and two children.

Her debut picture book, Penguin and Tiny Shrimp Don't Do Bedtime! (Balzer+Bray/Harper Collins) releases in May, 2018. 

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Guest Post: Yolanda Ridge on Writing Across Gender & Inside Hudson Pickle

Yolanda Ridge and her sons
By Yolanda Ridge 
for Cynthia Leitich Smith's Cynsations

When my stepdad finished reading my debut novel, Trouble in the Trees (Orca Book Publishers, 2011), he told me he enjoyed learning about my childhood.

(He also proudly proclaimed to have read it in two straight hours – a compliment that missed the mark since it had taken me over a year to write the book – but that’s a different post.)

The main character is nothing like me, I protested, easily dismissing the idea because he’d met me in my thirties.

But when I started writing my new release, Inside Hudson Pickle (Kids Can Press, Sept. 5, 2017), I realized he was more right than I’d wanted to admit.

Telling a story from the perspective of a twelve-year-old girl (who may not be me, exactly, but definitely the person I wanted to be when I was that age) was so much easier than trying to get inside the head of a thirteen-year-old boy.

In the early drafts of Inside Hudson Pickle, I focused on plot, drawing on my previous career as a genetic counselor to portray a family dealing with Alpha-1, a genetic disorder that increases the risk of liver and lung disease. 

I chose basketball as Hudson’s sport (because I’ve actually played it) rather than hockey (because I’ve only watched it). I did research to fill the gaps in my knowledge on asthma and house fires.

But when it came to character development, web searches didn’t cut it. I didn’t grow up with brothers and though I do have two sons, they were too young to provide insight on puberty. 

What was it like for a young athlete to go through a growth spurt? How do boys deal with voice changes?

I turned to my male critique partners for help. He’d be angrier, one suggested. You haven’t captured his growing pains, said another. 

I went back and tried to fold these things into the manuscript. But it was like mixing oil with water.

Giving the manuscript some time to rest, I read middle grade adventure books - a few of my favorites are The Boundless by Kenneth Oppel (Simon & Schuster, 2014), the Rex Zero series by Tim Wynne-Jones (Farrar Straus Giroux) and Orbiting Jupiter by Gary Schmidt (Clarion, 2015).

I watched family sitcoms. I listened to music recommended by my friend’s sons. I eavesdropped on conversations in the library, on the bus, at the skateboard park.

Returning to the manuscript, I peppered it with “boyness.” But in the end I had to admit: Hudson was still a lot like me.

In talking to other writers I now understand that we all incorporate bits of ourselves into our characters. 

I could give Hudson large doses of testosterone and his heart would essentially remain the same. Emotional reactions aren’t dictated by sex or age or skin color. Everyone is more complex than that, including our characters (if we’re doing it right).

I hope what I’ve captured in Inside Hudson Pickle is how one person might cope with the turmoil of health issues, family secrets, changing friendships and the simple desire to make a school basketball team. 

Sure, Hudson’s big feet get in the way at times. But overall, his experience is not male; it’s human.

Cynsational Notes

Inside Hudson Pickle is a Junior Library Guild Selection and School Library Journal said, "fans of novels about sports and family drama, such as Kwame Alexander's The Crossover (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014), will appreciate this realistic tale."

Yolanda Ridge is the author of three middle grade novels. With a master's degree in science and ten years of experience working as a genetic counselor, she's adept at making complex concepts understandable --- a skill she uses when crafting middle-grade novels, teaching and author visits.

She lives in the mountains of British Columbia in a log house brimming with boys, including one husband, two twin sons, one dog and one cat.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Call for Applications: Cynsations Intern

By Cynthia Leitich Smith
for Cynsations

Applications are invited for an intern to assist in the production of Cynsations and associated web-/social media for October to March of 2017. It may also include author event and manuscript research support.

Duties would include assistance with:
  • coordinating, conducting and formatting interviews, guest posts, and announcements that tie into the children's-YA literature, writing, illustration, publishing, educational and gatekeeper communities; 
  • promoting all of the above; 
  • updating Cynthia Leitich Smith's Children's Literature Resources and related social media channels.
The internship is non-paid, however, it will include a custom-tailored professional and creative advisory program, the specifics of which would depend on individual needs and interests.

In addition, the intern would be promoted across the platform. Note: realism and fantasy, children's-YA fiction writers only. No currently enrolled MFA students.

The opportuity is ideal for children's-YA writers who are not-yet-published but have been steadily writing and pursuing craft-building opportunities (such as SCBWI or Highlights workshops, a completed MFA, writers.com classes, etc.) as well as new voices, and/or writers with a history of publication who're looking to shift age-level and/or genre focus, want to take craft to the next level, and/or are interested in building marketing skills and savvy.

Between Sept. 11 and Sept. 30, please email cynthia at cynthialeitichsmith.com with a 500-word statement of interest that touches on:
  • commitment to the youth literature, its conversations and community;
  • study in the craft of writing for young readers;
  • social media savvy.
Please include relevant links. References and/or interest in diverse (defined broadly) youth literature also are especially welcome and should be mentioned.

Thank you for your consideration!

Sunday, September 10, 2017

In Memory: Rebecca Bond

By Cynthia Leitich Smith
for Cynsations

Author-illustrator Rebecca Bond died in August while Cynsations was on summer hiatus.

Obituary: Rebecca Bond by Emily Kantor from Publishers Weekly. Peek: "Rebecca Bond, who created 10 books for young readers, died on August 2 after a brief illness. She was 45.

"Bond was named a PW Flying Start in 1999 for her debut picture book, Just Like a Baby (Little, Brown). Bond went on to write and illustrate...Escape from Baxters’ Barn (HMH, 2015) and Out of the Woods: A True Story of an Unforgettable Event (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015), inspired by her grandfather’s childhood. ...Bond was a senior designer at HMH Books for Young Readers; she joined the company in 2008 and worked there until her death."

Fall 1999 Flying Starts: Rebecca Bond: A Combination of Talents by Heather Vogel Frederick from Publishers Weekly. Peek, quoting Rebecca: "'It's almost ridiculous that only my name is on the front of the book,' she says modestly. 'It's a huge collaboration! So many people put their time into it--it's all of our book. I really feel that somewhere it should say Megan's name and Judy Sue's name. They helped make it work.'"
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